Penticton

Poll shows rural residents support two-tier rates

The results of the citizens' survey can be found here.

Nearly two-thirds of rural residents would rather pay higher user fees than see their taxes go up to pay for facilities in neighbouring municipalities, according to a new citizens’ survey.

Sixty-four per cent of people polled by the Regional District of Okanagan-Similkameen preferred the idea of a two-tiered rate structure so those who use public facilities elsewhere pay their fair share.

SOPAC looking for political support

This story is relevant to Area F because rural Penticton would likely be invited to help pay for such a facility.  I have attached the budget page for 2007 (the most recent I have) for the Vernon performing arts center.  You will see that Vernon, Coldstream, and RDNO areas B and C contribute to the Vernon facility through a tax requisition.  This tax helps cover the interest and principal on the building itself plus various operations subsidies.  The total tax requisition for all four jurisdictions in 2007 was $1.145M.

Election 2014: West Bench candidates spar over fences

Mending fences with Penticton and building fences to keep out feral horses were among the themes Thursday at an all-candidates forum on the West Bench.

Incumbent Michael Brydon and challenger Ronald Johnson, who are running to represent Area F on the board of the Regional District of Okanagan-Similkameen, squared off in front of about 50 people inside the community’s school library

Brydon, a university professor seeking a third term as director, told the crowd he’s running on his track record and will take direction from voters about what his priorities should be.

Grant money goes down the drain

[I have not had much occasion in the past to agree with Mr. Walker (global warming, diagnosis of the SOEC's woes) but I do agree with the basic thesis of this editorial: The recent West Bench water referendum was a significant economic setback for the City of Penticton.]

The residents of West Bench threw another monkey wrench into Penticton council’s plans.

Non-residents will pay more to use recreation facilities

By  -   (link to story)

If you want to play then you have got to pay.

Penticton council voted 4-3 to establish a two-tiered recreation fee structure that will charge non-Penticton residents more money to use city facilities.

The new fee structure will be limited to the Penticton Community Centre along with its pool and fitness room, McLaren Arena and the Cleland Community Theatre.

Region must share in facilities’ costs

Charging a higher rate for using the city’s recreational facilities hardly seems like a neighbourly thing to do. But Penticton council was left with little choice when they approved a two-tiered fee structure earlier this week.

Under the proposal, which still needs to have items such as pricing ironed out, those living in areas outside the city boundaries will have to pay more to use the Penticton Community Centre and pool, McLaren Arena and Cleland Community Theatre.

The threat of two-tiered user fees for recreation

I recieved the following question recently from a concerned resident:

What is your position on the surcharging of children involved in sports when using Penticton facilities?  I understand that my children will now be subjected to a user fee to engage in Penticton Minor Hockey.  Are we not trying to encourage families to engage in healthy lifestyles with active bodies?  This measure seems to speak against the value of involvement in physical activity.  Children who live outside of the Penticton tax zone will be penalized and many will not engage as a result of being priced out of participating. This is a major step in the wrong direction.  Many families on the West Bench and outlying areas are having their ability to cover costs stretched far too far. This is another of those situations.

Background on the City of Penticton's two-tier scheme can be found here.

City and band square off over KVR Trail

The Penticton Indian Band is in a struggle with the city over control of portions of the Kettle Valley Railway trail that pass through the band’s land. Penticton Council voted 4-2 Monday to write a letter to Indian and Northern Affairs Canada stating that it is the city’s position that the roughly 139 acres of land, six parcels in all, should be maintained in its current ownership by the citizens of Canada. The letter is a response to an INAC request for any comments or concerns regarding a PIB application to have the land added to Penticton Indian Reserve.

Two-tiered user fees

I sent the following email to Penticton Mayor Dan Ashton regarding two-tiered user fees for recreational assets owned by the City of Penticton:

-----Original Message-----
From: "Michael Brydon"
To: "Dan Ashton"
Subject: Two-tiered recreation fees

Hi Dan,

I was just catching up on my reading following a couple of weeks of vacation and was alarmed to read a story in the Herald (12 Mar, 2009) about the City of Penticton "scrambling" to implement a two-tiered recreation fee. I inherited a binder from Ron Perrie entitled "Sub-Regional Recreation" that discusses the current situation in which 23% of those who register for programs with the City of Penticton's Recreation Department are not residents of the City. Documents in the binder argues for "fairness" in shouldering the burden of subsidies for these programs.

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