Round 2: inputs for Round 3

[The following are the results from Round 2.  Participants see this information when evaluating the same alternatives in Round 3:]

Question   Summary of responses from the previous round
(average score = 3.29)
  Selected comments from panel members
How desirable is "fence range land used by horses" as a solution to the horse problem?
 
    percent of responses from panel
    10%   30%   50%   70%   90%  
Very desirable (4)
   
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Desirable (3)
   
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Undesirable (2)
   
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Very undesirable (1)
   
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Round 1:
  • includes cattle guards and stiles; includes monitoring and maintenance
Round 2:
  • Proven to have worked in the past
  • I think this is the only permanent solution that is going to work.
  • We'd still presumably see them on the distant hills which is a desirable outcome. They wouldn't be taken away from First Nations land and our West Bench properties wouldn't be impacted.
  • Very desirable because it is something within our control.
  • Works only if recreational users respect fences; provisions for recreational access is important.
  • May require additional measures to ensure food supply is adequate for horses; doesn't prevent starving on the other side of the fence.
Question   Summary of responses from the previous round
(average score = 2.94)
  Selected comments from panel members
How desirable is "sterilization of select horses (e.g., stallions)" as a solution to the horse problem?
 
    percent of responses from panel
    10%   30%   50%   70%   90%  
Very desirable (4)
   
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Desirable (3)
   
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Undesirable (2)
   
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Very undesirable (1)
   
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Round 1:
  • (none)
Round 2:
  • Not an immediate solution nor a complete solution.
  • Castrated/gelding stallions is dangerous, inhumane and ineffective (unless you get all the stallions). Use a contraceptive vaccine to dart mares and they are unable to have foals.
  • Would require cooperation from the Penticton Indian Band.
  • This is an effective way to control the herd size.
  • This could be done in conjunction with fencing the grazing areas.
  • Must still allow some procreation if the herd is to be maintained for the longer term.
Question   Summary of responses from the previous round
(average score = 2.08)
  Selected comments from panel members
How desirable is "cull" as a solution to the horse problem?
 
    percent of responses from panel
    10%   30%   50%   70%   90%  
Very desirable (4)
   
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Desirable (3)
   
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Undesirable (2)
   
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Very undesirable (1)
   
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Round 1:
  • round-up and disposal of all roaming horses
Round 2:
  • There are some extremely poorly bred re physical/medical issues to some of those horses.
  • Has been tried in the past. Eventually the numbers grow again.
  • I think this is too drastic. We live in a semi-rural environment and wildlife and feral animals are part of the environment.
  • Animal slaughter is a ruthless way of solving the problem
  • Cull is not the solution—elimination of animals in our area is the solution.
Question   Summary of responses from the previous round
(average score = 2.64)
  Selected comments from panel members
How desirable is "feeding and watering stations away from populated areas" as a solution to the horse problem?
 
    percent of responses from panel
    10%   30%   50%   70%   90%  
Very desirable (4)
   
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Desirable (3)
   
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Undesirable (2)
   
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Very undesirable (1)
   
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Round 1:
  • eliminate requirement for horse to move to lower elevations in winter
Round 2:
  • Does not by itself prevent horses from coming to well populated areas; it will not solve the problem if the horses are not contained.
  • At what point does it end and the owner takes responsibility for his/her animals? Who will pay?
  • Could work, it would be worth a try first, before expensive fences are built. I would like horses to stay in the general vicinity.
  • Tried north of Summerland for deer but abandoned and fence installed.
  • In severely cold weather it would be helpful; without a large snow cover they can do as every other feral horse does.
  • Some residents would probably volunteer, but this must be coupled with humanely regulating population growth.
Question   Summary of responses from the previous round
(average score = 2.89)
  Selected comments from panel members
How desirable is "make proven owners responsible for stewardship of animals" as a solution to the horse problem?
 
    percent of responses from panel
    10%   30%   50%   70%   90%  
Very desirable (4)
   
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Desirable (3)
   
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Undesirable (2)
   
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Very undesirable (1)
   
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Round 1:
  • (none)
Round 2:
  • Good luck with this. A recipe for conflict and continued failure.
  • Some are branded, some (but not all) owners can be identified. What about the "wild ones"?
  • Enforce federal animal cruelty laws if basic needs aren't met.
  • There would need to be strict enforcement in place, as these owners have never been responsible for their horses. I think that sounds combative.
  • Our values might be different and you can't force your values on others, especially when a price tag is involved for the other party.
  • Owners must be made responsible for the health and well being of their animals.
Question   Summary of responses from the previous round
(average score = 2.50)
  Selected comments from panel members
How desirable is "improved signage on roads to warn motorists of horses" as a solution to the horse problem?
 
    percent of responses from panel
    10%   30%   50%   70%   90%  
Very desirable (4)
   
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Desirable (3)
   
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Undesirable (2)
   
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Very undesirable (1)
   
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Round 1:
  • (none)
Round 2:
  • Does nothing to address the property damage issue. We already know the horses are around.
  • This is not a full solution, but could help. Certainly can't hurt.
  • Only if the sign says "Horses go home!"
  • Excuses those who should be in care and control of their animals and the province for not fencing the area.
Question   Summary of responses from the previous round
(average score = 2.06)
  Selected comments from panel members
How desirable is "residents to fence their yards individually" as a solution to the horse problem?
 
    percent of responses from panel
    10%   30%   50%   70%   90%  
Very desirable (4)
   
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Desirable (3)
   
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Undesirable (2)
   
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Very undesirable (1)
   
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Round 1:
  • (none)
Round 2:
  • Does nothing to address the road safety issue. This is the status quo.
  • Some properties too big plus detracts from appeal of living in these rural areas.
  • Will solve the problem for individual property owners.
  • The West Bench is an interface area with all kinds of animals wandering through it and we all chose to live in this semi-rural environment.
  • It is high time that the onus for fencing is taken off the victims and placed squarely on the horse owners.
  • Many residents do not agree that they should have to fence their yards.
  • Residents are responsible for their property—shifting the blame/cost onto the rest of society is irresponsible.
  • When I fence my property, I send horses onto my neighbor's property and vice versa - it also concentrates horses into an ever shrinking area making them more dangerous.
Question   Summary of responses from the previous round
(average score = 2.25)
  Selected comments from panel members
How desirable is "round-up and relocate of horses to a less populated area" as a solution to the horse problem?
 
    percent of responses from panel
    10%   30%   50%   70%   90%  
Very desirable (4)
   
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Desirable (3)
   
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Undesirable (2)
   
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Very undesirable (1)
   
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Round 1:
  • (none)
Round 2:
  • Simply shifts the problem. If there isn't food and water they will have to wander to survive.
  • Unpopulated areas may lack food and lead to massive starvation.
  • What prevents them from coming back?
  • People should learn to co-habit with animals, especially when they decided to put their houses on land that was being used by horses long before.
  • That might analogous to "rearranging the deck chairs on the Titanic". Those horses may return to residential areas with more vegetation.
Question   Summary of responses from the previous round
(average score = 1.87)
  Selected comments from panel members
How desirable is "fence using wide bands of river rock instead of conventional fencing" as a solution to the horse problem?
 
    percent of responses from panel
    10%   30%   50%   70%   90%  
Very desirable (4)
   
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Desirable (3)
   
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Undesirable (2)
   
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Very undesirable (1)
   
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Round 1:
  • large boulders can work like a cattle guard
Round 2:
  • Not sure this is cheaper than fencing.
  • Likely to be less effective, especially in snow.
  • Environmentally destructive to build.
  • Horses CAN jump up to 7' high if "the grass is greener on the other side".
  • Aesthetic partial solution, may beat ugly ropes and flashy tape.
  • May be incorporated into typical fencing methods where a different solution is required.
  • Horses can scramble over rock to get to food - they can also be seriously injured in doing so.
Question   Summary of responses from the previous round
(average score = 2.76)
  Selected comments from panel members
How desirable is "round-up and impound horses: allow ranchers and others to adopt" as a solution to the horse problem?
 
    percent of responses from panel
    10%   30%   50%   70%   90%  
Very desirable (4)
   
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Desirable (3)
   
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Undesirable (2)
   
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Very undesirable (1)
   
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Round 1:
  • (none)
Round 2:
  • Assumes a large demand for these horses; could create friction with horse owners.
  • This works and has been used successfully in Summerland.
  • This has been tried already. It isn't a long term solution.
  • Horse ownership is extremely expensive. Horse sales world-wide are so effected by the economy, owners are not even recovering the cost of stud fees for the prices achieved.
  • Who would monitor this to ensure that the horses aren't just purchased for dog food?
  • This would reduce the herd somewhat without culling or sterilization.
Question   Summary of responses from the previous round
(average score = 2.53)
  Selected comments from panel members
How desirable is "round-up and impound horses: sell at auction" as a solution to the horse problem?
 
    percent of responses from panel
    10%   30%   50%   70%   90%  
Very desirable (4)
   
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Desirable (3)
   
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Undesirable (2)
   
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Very undesirable (1)
   
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Round 1:
  • (none)
Round 2:
  • Assumes a market for these horses exists.
  • Requires cooperation of owners. May create legal issues.
  • We won't get them all and they will continue to breed.
  • They are in such poor shape that they will only go for slaughter. Fate of horses may not be a happy one.
  • We have to get over the notion that horses must be pets, no reason they can't be wild
  • This can be expanded on to be a program that has troubled youth/adults work with horses as a rehab program and then sells them to support the program.
Question   Summary of responses from the previous round
(average score = 2.47)
  Selected comments from panel members
How desirable is "work with First Nations and learn from and utilize their methods of herd management" as a solution to the horse problem?
 
    percent of responses from panel
    10%   30%   50%   70%   90%  
Very desirable (4)
   
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Desirable (3)
   
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Undesirable (2)
   
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Very undesirable (1)
   
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Round 1:
  • (none)
Round 2:
  • Has not worked so far.
  • Would do much to improve community relations
  • As long as they recognize the 'carrying capacity' of the rangeland, which is currently very very overgrazed
  • We should be working with First nations, but their present methods are part of the problem.
  • That might be interesting, I would like to hear their input at some point in the process.
Question   Summary of responses from the previous round
(average score = 2.27)
  Selected comments from panel members
How desirable is "return branded horses to their First Nations owners/dispose of the balance" as a solution to the horse problem?
 
    percent of responses from panel
    10%   30%   50%   70%   90%  
Very desirable (4)
   
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Desirable (3)
   
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Undesirable (2)
   
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Very undesirable (1)
   
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Round 1:
  • (none)
Round 2:
  • Does not solve the problem of roaming horses. Will not prevent the horses from being turned out, reproducing, starving and cycle repeating.
  • Alert the owners of branded horses, possibly.
  • Still have the wild ones to contend with.
  • They'll be back the next week.
Question   Summary of responses from the previous round
(average score = 2.54)
  Selected comments from panel members
How desirable is "enact bylaw to prevent feeding of roaming horses in populated areas" as a solution to the horse problem?
 
    percent of responses from panel
    10%   30%   50%   70%   90%  
Very desirable (4)
   
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Desirable (3)
   
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Undesirable (2)
   
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Very undesirable (1)
   
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Round 1:
  • (none)
Round 2:
  • Horses go where the feed is. Such a bylaw would eliminate some of the incentive for horses to be in this neighborhood.
  • These aren't wildlife who can find feed elsewhere
  • Feeding stations should be set up are set up in non populated areas only.
  • Like do not feed the ducks and geese.We are not all horse lovers.
  • A bylaw is not required - the people feeding in populated areas just need to be approached.
  • What kind of a society are we if we can't share some of our resources with non-human species?
  • Feeding roaming horses only exacerbates the problem: it attracts animals to the area and absolves owners from their responsibilities.
Question   Summary of responses from the previous round
(average score = 2.49)
  Selected comments from panel members
How desirable is "lobby Provincial Government to solve the problem" as a solution to the horse problem?
 
    percent of responses from panel
    10%   30%   50%   70%   90%  
Very desirable (4)
   
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Desirable (3)
   
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Undesirable (2)
   
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Very undesirable (1)
   
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Round 1:
  • (none)
Round 2:
  • Sure, but they have done nothing in 20 years; not realistic.
  • This only bogs down any possible solution with red tape. A solution can be found through dialogue and common sense approach.
  • It would be nice to have monetary support for solving this issue without culling or displacement of the horses.
  • Federal and/or Provincial cooperation needed for any of the solutions
  • Lobbying for funding is a sensible solution. But it is still our problem to solve.
Question   Summary of responses from the previous round
(average score = 1.49)
  Selected comments from panel members
How desirable is "permit a limited-entry horse hunt in the region" as a solution to the horse problem?
 
    percent of responses from panel
    10%   30%   50%   70%   90%  
Very desirable (4)
   
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Desirable (3)
   
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Undesirable (2)
   
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Very undesirable (1)
   
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Round 1:
  • (none)
Round 2:
  • Contrary to virtually all our objectives.
  • This has been tried at least once in the late 80's early 90's by the Band. They also tried a round up where a payment was made for each horse brought in. It did not work.
  • This will be a public relations nightmare.
  • No words could cover a comment on this solution.
Question   Summary of responses from the previous round
(average score = 2.33)
  Selected comments from panel members
How desirable is "educate rural residents on what it means to live in a rural area" as a solution to the horse problem?
 
    percent of responses from panel
    10%   30%   50%   70%   90%  
Very desirable (4)
   
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Desirable (3)
   
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Undesirable (2)
   
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Very undesirable (1)
   
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Round 1:
  • (none)
Round 2:
  • Does not address health or safety issues of horses or residents.
  • Education regarding technologies or other strategies might help us live harmoniously with these animals.
  • We would be educated but the horses will still be here.
  • Education would, hopefully, go beyond horses to other aspects of rural living - native species, habitat protection, etc.
Question   Summary of responses from the previous round
(average score = 2.08)
  Selected comments from panel members
How desirable is "install more street lights" as a solution to the horse problem?
 
    percent of responses from panel
    10%   30%   50%   70%   90%  
Very desirable (4)
   
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Desirable (3)
   
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Undesirable (2)
   
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Very undesirable (1)
   
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Round 1:
  • (none)
Round 2:
  • Does not address property damage issue. May or may not improve the safety of roads.
  • It is a partial solution for harm reduction. Doesn't contribute to long term solution or herd management.
  • I do not like streetlights in rural areas. But a couple strategically placed, perhaps.

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